Study finds dietary apps for patients with CKD are limited in quantity, quality

23 August 2021

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Russell does not report any relevant financial information. Please refer to the study for all relevant financial information from the other authors.

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After the researchers searched the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store for all of the mobile applications that focus on nutritional management in patients with chronic kidney disease, the researchers found that the “few” existed important limitations.

Therefore, Carl R. Russell III, from the College of Engineering at Purdue University in Indiana and colleagues claimed that work was still needed to develop improved applications that address the “unmet need.”[s]“This patient population.

Nutritional apps for CRF

The content of the infographic was adapted from Russell CR et al. J Ren Nutrit. 2021; doi: 10.1053 / j.jrn.2021.06.006.

Potential of CKD Diet Apps

“Internet-based applications offer the possibility [the] Gates [put forth by the 2020 Kidney Disease Quality Outcomes Initiative Clinical Practice Guideline for Nutrition in CKD] in a way not previously available by allowing individuals to easily access food and nutritional databases, count calories, track macro and micronutrient intake, and track weight and other nutritional indexes. An ideal app would also give doctors or qualified dietitians secure access to this data if they so wish. Such an app could help achieve goals of improving both health care and a patient’s health.

The objectives of this study were to identify existing CKD diet apps, determine how well these apps meet the criteria of an ideal app, and conduct a systematic literature review to assess the quality of such apps and, more generally, the condition of CKD dieting apps. or to rate related apps. We conducted our analysis with regard to whether current apps adequately meet the needs of the CKD population or whether additional work is required in this area. “

For the initial search, a team of reviewers used the following keywords and phrases: CKD, Kidney Nutrition, CKD Diet, Kidney Diet, Nutrition Tracker CKD, CKD Diet, Chronic Kidney Failure, CKD, Dialysis, and Dialysis Diet. This search identified 3,204 apps, but only 10 were included in the analysis that met the following criteria: CKD-diet-related, in English; patient-oriented; updated after 2010; and available for download from major app sources or for publication in a magazine.

Criteria for an “ideal” app

“Every app was [then] examined for the presence of ideal properties, ”write the researchers. “The app was checked for acquisition costs; Availability in the Google Play Store and Apple App Store; whether it references guidelines or sources; if the app was developed for patients with CRF; when it was able to save patient data; when it allows patients to track their own nutrient intake; if the app has made prescriptions available to the patient; whether the patient’s stored data could be shared with a clinician; if the app allows personalization of recommendations based on the CKD stage; and whether the app allows further changes in order to take personalized diet recommendations into account. “

The results suggest that, of the 10 apps, eight were developed solely for nutritional management in CKD, seven were free, five contained CKD-friendly prescriptions, four contained personalized recommendations based on patient-provided data, and four contained macronutrient and nutritional intake Followed micronutrients and made specific dietary recommendations; two were available in both the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store and only one offered the ability to share health information.

Russell and colleagues emphasized that none of the apps “used the most current dietary guidelines as the basis of their recommendations” (specifically the KDOQI 2020 Dietary Guideline).

In addition, the researchers found that the apps were “difficult to use” and often required a high level of e-knowledge, but also lacked sufficient security features.

“Content isn’t the only important aspect of a CRF diet app. Careful consideration should also be incorporated into the software design, ”the researchers wrote. “Access on multiple platforms is important for better accessibility. The ability to share and store data with doctors, nutritionists, or other health care providers could lead to more collaborative patient care.

In fact, making sure doctors, dietitians and patients all have a role to play in developing a new app will be critical to ensure it is optimally designed. “

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