Dietitian Paula Norris shares photos of her stir fry meals but one has many more calories than other

Can you tell which meal is healthier? Dietitian shares photos of her roast pork – but one packs a lot more calories

  • A nutritionist revealed how diet adjustments can make a big difference in calories
  • Paula Norris from Melbourne shared a picture of two almost identical stir-fries
  • But where one of the dishes was 680 calories, the other was only 450 calories
  • Paula said she did this by cutting down on pasta and pork and increasing vegetables
  • She advocates the idea of ​​”volume eating”, where you eat more for less

A nutritionist showed how optimizing your diet with a few simple food swaps can make a big difference in your total caloric intake.

Melbourne’s Paula Norris shared a picture of two almost identical stir-fries of noodle – but one dish contains 230 calories more than the other.

The nutrition expert explained how the dish can be reduced from 680 calories to 450 calories with just a few changes to the ingredients.

To do this, you need to reduce the portion size of pork and pasta, increase the amount of vegetables in the bowl, and optimize the amount of sauce.

Melbourne’s Paula Norris shared a picture of two almost identical stir-fries of noodle – but one dish contains 230 calories more than the other (both pork dishes pictured).

Paula posted on Instagram: “Consuming more volume with the same or even fewer calories is the key to feeling full.

“As you can see, with a few tweaks you can save calories while keeping protein levels that will keep you full and increase your intake of micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) from more vegetables.”

She added, “Of course the one on the left is fine too, especially if you have higher calorie needs”.

It’s worth noting, however, that 230 calories in just one meal, five days a week, adds up to over eight pounds of calories a year.

Paula (pictured) said:

Paula (pictured) said: “Consuming more volume for the same or even fewer calories is the key to feeling full”; She follows this practice and fills all of her dishes with additional vegetables

What does the meal on the left contain?

200g lean pork

1/4 red onion

One small carrot

1/4 paprika

Broccoli with a flower

A spear of asparagus

Two teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil

Two teaspoons of reduced salt soy sauce

Two teaspoons of oyster sauce

1/4 teaspoon Sriracha chili sauce

A pack of udon noodles

What does the right meal contain?

100g lean pork

1/4 red onion

One medium-sized carrot

1/2 bell pepper

Broccoli with three florets

Three asparagus spears

One teaspoon of extra virgin olive oil

Two teaspoons of reduced salt soy sauce

Two teaspoons of oyster sauce

1/4 teaspoon Sriracha chili sauce

1/2 packet of udon noodles ⠀⠀

Paula went on to reveal the exact differences between the 680 calorie meal on the left and the 450 calorie meal on the right.

To save 230 calories on the meal on the right, Paula halved the amount of pork and pasta, doubled the veggies, and cut down on the amount of high-calorie foods like extra virgin olive oil, soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sriracha chilli sauce.

Many praised her for sharing their comparisons, with one saying, “That’s all about it,” and others thanking her for sharing such useful nutritional information.

In the past, she has asked her followers to tell the difference between a range of different meals, from a simple salad with chicken and rice to a fresh pasta dish (pictured).

In the past, she has asked her followers to tell the difference between a range of different meals, from a simple salad with chicken and rice to a fresh pasta dish (pictured).

This isn’t the first comparison the nutritionist has shared with her Instagram followers.

In the past, Paula has asked her followers to tell the difference between a number of different meals, from a simple salad with chicken and rice to a fresh pasta dish that has reduced the pasta and improved the vegetable quota.

Paula said that after several years of difficulty eating, she is now a “bulk eater” and this allows her to control her high hunger and “get all the nutrients” she needs without thinking too much about food or calories to have to.

“Now I enjoy food without counting or worrying about excluding any food,” she said.

Paula Norris promotes this idea of ​​volume eating with her followers Instagram.

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